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Tommy Emmanuel

Tommy Emmanuel, an Australian guitarist known for his complex fingerstyle technique, energetic performances, and the use of percussive effects on the guitar, has achieved enough musical milestones to satisfy several lifetimes. He has now been playing professionally for almost 60 years. He started playing guitar at age 4 he was taught to accompany his mother while she played the lap guitar. By age of 6, he was touring Australia with his family band. By 30, he was a rock lead guitarist playing stadiums.

 

At 44, he was one of five people named a Certified Guitar Player (CGP) by Chet Atkins, Tommy’s musical idol who influenced the development of his solo style, which Today, he plays sold-out solo shows from Nashville to Sydney to London. His solo guitar performance includes the sounds of a whole band: drums, bass, rhythm, lead guitar, and vocal melody simultaneously. While some artists take full bands on the road, Tommy builds his band entirely on his own with no overdubs or loops.

In Tommy’s travels, he meets guitarists of all levels. Some have been playing guitar for a long time, while others are beginners. No matter your current level, Tommy’s fingerstyle series, Fingerstyle Milestone, and Fingerstyle Breakthroughs, will help you develop your Fingerstyle picking.

In the Fingerstyle Milestone, you will learn skills to get the thumb going, as well as, develop the independence of your right hand. In the orientation section, Tommy discusses different guitars, where they are used, strings, and thumb picks. In the second section, you will begin to learn the different sounds, like the boomchick made with the thumb, the importance of the thumb angle, and where to put your thumb pick. In the third and fourth sections, you will learn how to combine all of the movements to create the desired sounds while applying them to familiar songs.

Guitar students worldwide wonder if the “six-string-magic” Tommy creates with his guitar is even possible. Even the more advanced guitarists struggle to imitate his fretboard techniques and finesse. All the video lessons, tabs, and notation will only get you so far. But, Tommy Emmanuel’s new interactive video courses, Fingerstyle Milestones, and Fingerstyle Breakthrough, will help you achieve your dream of playing Fingerstyle Guitar.

In Tommy’s TrueFire Channel – Up Close & Personal,  you will learn how to play his songs. He also shares some of his guitar tips and reveals how to solve the mysteries of playing guitar as he does.

Tommy does a deep dive into the inspiration behind a lot of his wordless stories.

He performs and teaches from The Best of Tommysongs, containing many of his best original works, plus many previously unreleased songs. Tommy solely wrote, produced, and recorded all of the tracks on this record.

In Tommy’s Up Close & Personal Channel, he teaches many fan-favorite songs, such as Halfway Home, Lewis & Clark, Endless Road, Cowboy’s Dream, Mombassa, It’s Never Too Late, and many other fan favorites. Plus, previously unreleased songs such as The Wide Ocean, Timberland, Sail On, and Song for a Rainy Morning. This learning experience is exclusively available only on his channel.

In addition to “up close and personal” videos with Tommy covering technique, tips, and insights, subscribers will have access to Tommy’s master library tabs covering dozens and dozens of Tommy’s songs. 

Tommy will also be posting new videos and lessons every month. Subscribe now and get Up Close & Personal with Tommy Emmanuel on TrueFire!

Tommy now has a second subscription option that features all of the channel offerings, PLUS a monthly Zoom Workshop. Choose the subscription that’s right for you!

 Click to watch and listen to clips of some of Tommy’s courses below.

Taylor Acoustic Guitars

Taylor Guitars, one of the largest acoustic guitar manufacturers in the United States, is located in El Cajon, California. They specialize in acoustic guitars in a variety of different sizes, plus semi-hollow body electric guitars. Their lower priced guitars, the Baby Taylor and Big Baby Taylor acoustic guitars are both made just over the border near Tecate, Mexico.

The Big Baby Taylor Guitar (BBT) is one of the top travel acoustic guitars on the market today. It is portable, playable, and affordable. It’s styled after the bigger dreadnoughts, though, size-wise, it’s between the Baby Taylor and the full-size dreadnoughts, making it perfect for travel, while producing more volume and bass response than other travel acoustic guitars.ous

Body and Neck of the Acoustic Guitars

Taylor has a unique neck construction, a bolt-on neck, that was patented in 1999 called the NT (new technology) neck. It is different from other acoustic guitars in that the neck consists of one continuous piece of wood all the way to the 19th fret to support the fretboard.

The body on the Big Baby Taylor is unique in that it has a 15/16th-size non-cutaway dreadnought shape, with a full 4” body depth and a scale length of 25.5”. Thus, you get a acoustic guitar that is smaller than a dreadnought but with similar projection and richness to the dreadnought sound.

When playing the BBT, you can tell it’s smaller, but with the feel of a basic acoustic guitar. The tuners are also the same as a basic acoustic guitar with comparable action. The differences aren’t enough to trip you up.

The construction of tonewoods gives the look and feel of quality that the Taylor is known for. The top is made from solid Sitka spruce with laminated sapele for the back and sides with a matte finish. It also includes a single ring rosette and tortoiseshell pickguard which enhance the refined look.

The slim neck is constructed of solid sapele, with a genuine African ebony fretboard with 20 frets and simple dot inlays.

Hardware

A set of chrome die-cast tuners on the Taylor-branded head is a complement to the Big Baby Taylor. Just below the head is a Nubone nut which is similar in consistency to TUSQ. At the other end, the Micarta saddle sits on the African ebony bridge.

Sound

The original Baby Taylor has the traditional small acoustic guitar sound, but the Big Baby Taylor, which is closer to a full-size body depth yields plenty of projection, resonance, and sustain.

The sound is definitely not an SJ200 or one of the other dreadnoughts. It does not have the jumbo body sound, but surprisingly it has a fairly loud sound for the size. If you are looking for an acoustic guitar with a full sound but small enough to travel, the BBT is the acoustic guitar you are looking for.

The intonation of many of the smaller guitars gets a bit quirky, but the intonation in the Big Baby Taylor is great. They have compensated for the intonation with the arched back, which gives strength and a fuller tone. The B string is also set back just a little to help with the intonation.

Conclusion

The Big Baby Taylor Acoustic Guitars are well suited as a travel acoustic guitar, but because of its larger size, is not limited to a travel guitar or for those with smaller hands. It has a bright, crisp sound with enough natural projection for strumming, flat-picking, or fingerpicking.

It is shipped with a deluxe stylish Taylor gig bag that fits snuggly over the guitar for protection.

Features

Body

  • Body type: Dreadnought 15/16th-Scale
  • Cutaway: No
  • Top wood: Solid Sitka Spruce
  • Back & sides: Layered Walnut
  • Bracing pattern: Taylor Standard Big Baby X-Bracing
  • Body finish: Satin Varnish
  • Orientation: Right-Handed

Neck

  • Neck shape: Taylor Standard Big Baby Profile
  • Nut width: 1 11/16″ (42.8mm)
  • Fingerboard: Genuine West African Ebony
  • Neck wood: Hard Rock Maple
  • Scale length: 25-1/2″
  • Number of frets: 20
  • Neck finish: Satin Varnish

Electronics

  • Pickup/preamp: ES-B
  • Brand: Taylor
  • Configuration: Under-Saddle Piezo
  • Preamp EQ: Volume and Tone
  • Feedback filter: No
  • Tuner: Yes

Other

  • Headstock overlay: Copafera
  • Tuning machines: Chrome Big Baby Tuners and Buttons
  • Bridge: Genuine West African Ebony
  • Saddle & nut: Micarta Saddle and Nubone Nut
  • Number of strings: 6
  • Special features: Faux Tortoise Pickguard
  • Case: Taylor Deluxe Big Baby Gig Bag
  • Accessories: None
  • Country of origin: Mexico

The Martin Acoustic-Electric Guitar GPC-16E, first introduced at Nashville NAMM 2019, is an exciting addition to the redesigned 16 Series guitars. It is a 25.4” scale length, Grand Performance acoustic-electric guitar great, for the guitarist who wants the warm, full tone with robust projection.

All Music Things - Martin Acoustic Electric Guitar

Body and Neck

The Martin Acoustic-Electric Guitar GPC-16E is an American-made Martin guitar crafted with satin-finished East Indian Rosewood back and sides and a Sitka Spruce top. Even with its solid wood construction, it is more affordable than some of the other Martin guitars, such as the D18 or D28.

The 14-fret Grand Performance has a thinner 000 depth, which provides a satisfying body resonance and fuller bass tones.

The cutaway model allows easy access to the higher register. The high-performance neck taper, with bold herringbone rosettes, makes for easy playability up and down the fretboard, great for fingerpicking or strumming, live or unplugged.

The model number GP tells us that the guitar is a Grand Performance body. This body shape has been in Martin’s lineup for a number of years and is similar to a Taylor Grand Auditorium, which is Taylor’s most popular and versatile body shape.
Both mid-size models blend some of the characteristics found in their small body guitars with those of the larger dreadnoughts for a more versatile guitar for the modern guitarist.

Hardware

The GPC-16E comes equipped with factory-installed Fishman® Matrix VT Enhance electronics.

The Enhance feature also adds an output and sensitivity boost, perfect for those with a percussive touch.

The battery box is located between the endpin and 1/4″ jack so replacements do not require removal of the strings.

The GPC-16E comes strung with Authentic Acoustic Lifespan® 2.0 light gauge strings.

Instead of having a cutout in the side of the guitar for the controls, like some guitars, the
Fishman® Matrix VT controls are right at your fingertips in the soundhole. This includes the volume and tone controls (VT) in the upper part of the soundhole and the Enhance control (a bridge plate transducer) in the lower part of the soundhole.

Sound

The East Indian Rosewood back and sides create a resonant sound with deep rich bass and bell-like trebles and excellent note definition. Whereas, the Sitka Spruce top yields a balanced tone and good projection.

The volume potential is not what you would expect from a dreadnought or a Jumbo guitar, but you can expect to get a lot of volume from the GPC-16E when you really dig into it.

If you play with a light to medium touch it is going to be louder than the bigger body guitars because you don’t have to expend as much energy to get the top moving, a benefit of a smaller body guitar.

Conclusion

The Martin GPC-16E Rosewood acoustic-electric guitar has a beautiful tone that complements the human voice of the performing guitarist, yet is perfect as a solo instrument or for recording tracks.
It is ideal for the player who plugs in or plays at home, with the comfort of a slightly smaller guitar but with an exceptional tone.

It is also available in the left-handed model.

Martin Acoustic-Electric Guitar GPC-16E

Features

Body
Body type: Grand Performance
Cutaway: Yes
Top wood: Sitka Spruce
Back & sides: East Indian Rosewood
Bracing pattern: Forward shifted X
Top finish: Gloss
Body finish: Satin
Orientation: Right-handed

Neck
Neck shape: Modified Low Oval with High-Performance Taper
Nut width: 1.75 in. (44.45 mm)
Fingerboard: Ebony
Neck wood: Select Hardwood
Scale length: 25.4 in.
Number of frets: 20
Neck finish: Satin

Electronics
Pickup/preamp: Yes
Brand: Fishman Matrix VT Enhance NT2
Configuration: Under saddle transducer
Preamp EQ: 2-band
Feedback filter: No
Tuner: No

Other
Headstock overlay: East Indian Rosewood
Tuning machines: Nickel Open Gear
Bridge: Ebony
Saddle: Compensated White Tusq
Nut: Bone
Number of strings: 6-string
Recommended Strings: Authentic Acoustic -Lifespan 2.0 – Light (MA540T)
Special features: Inlays
Case: Softshell
Accessories: None
Country of origin: United States

Sources:
Wikipedia (January 5, 2019) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreadnought_(guitar_type)
Graph Tech TUSQ Martin-style saddle. Retrieved from Sweetwater.com Retrieved from Musiciansfriend.com
https://www.martinguitar.com/guitars/16-series/gpc-16e/
https://www.sweetwater.com/store/search.php?s=Martin+GPC-16E
http://onemanz.com/guitar/2019-martin-models-review-16-series-all-of-them/

The Martin Acoustic Electric guitar D-16, a Martin Dreadnought, is made in Nazareth, PA, not in Mexico. It is made from all solid tonewood. and contains no laminates. It also uses all steel instead of nylon strings.

This Martin 16 Series Dreadnought is crafted with satin-finished ovangkol back and sides which helps with the resonant sound giving deep bass and rich overtones. Ovangkol is a special wood that can vary both in color and grain complexity giving a unique look. This model includes a mahogany burst Sitka spruce gloss top for balanced tone and projection and a high-performance neck taper for ease of playability up and down the fretboard. The D-16E comes equipped with Fishman Matrix VT Enhance NT2 electronics. Strung with Authentic Acoustic Lifespan® 2.0 light gauge strings and soft-shell case. Includes soft shell c

The Little Martin Acoustic Guitar, LX1R and LX1RE, their smallest travel guitar, is big on tone, quality, and versatility. If you’re looking for a quality acoustic guitar for a child or an adult with small hands, the Martin LX1 should be at the top of your list. It is the best in terms of quality, sound, and feel. For an authentic Made in Mexico Martin, it is surprisingly affordable.

Body & Neck

The LX1R has a smaller scale length, 23 inches, which is actually about two inches shorter. That means the frets are closer together, perfect for the smaller hand. The smaller size also makes this guitar perfect for travel.
The new LX1R with a hand-rubbed solid Sitka Spruce top and mahogany high-pressure laminate back and sides features the same great sound you will find in the top-of-the-line Martins.
The neck is made of rust birch laminate creating a very interesting pattern and feel. Richlite fingerboard and bridge make this little guitar sturdy for travel under different weather conditions.
This newest addition to the Martin family is built with the same quality Martin craftsmanship with an emphasis on producing a great sound in a small guitar, not like some of the student guitars on the market.

Hardware

These LX1R and LX1RE Little Martins are strictly acoustic with no electronics. See below for more on the LX1RE. Both Little Martins features a set of quality Martin-sealed chrome tuners. As with the other Martin tuners, they are smooth and easy to use while holding their tuning well.
You will also find that it comes equipped with a TUSQ nut and compensated saddle, a Richlite bridge, and strung with a set of Martin SP strings.

Sound

The Little Martin is durable, easy to play, and stays in tune. You might ask about the sound. Truthfully, it doesn’t have the full-rich sound of the Martin dreadnoughts, but it wasn’t designed to. However, it’s a perfect “pick up and play” guitar that you can take anywhere. It’s great for practice, jamming at home, taking on the road, or around a campfire.
While the Little Martin is Martin’s smallest guitar, it sounds well-balanced in tone and has that satisfying warmth that you’ve learned to count on from a quality built Martin.

LX1RE, The Electric Model

You get the same compact and affordability of the LX1R, but with the addition of a Fishman Sonitone pickup mic system, which is great for plugging in to quickly amplify your sound.

Conclusion

Straight out of the box, the Little Martin comes with a padded gigbag made of a tough ballistic cloth exterior, plush interior, backpack straps, and a front zipper compartment and fits over the guitar like a glove.

Photo by Yan Krukov from Pexels

Photo by Yan Krukov from Pexels

Have you ever wanted to learn how to play a musical instrument or do something so bad you could feel it?

Think back to when you first had the desire to play a guitar or piano or another instrument.

I remember when I was four. We had a piano in our living room and I just couldn’t keep my hands off it. Every chance I’d get I’d be plunking out a nursery rhyme or another song I had heard.

My mother was adamant that I was going to be classically trained. So the journey began.

The Guitar Enthusiast

Image by Pierre Prégardien from Pixabay

Image by Pierre Prégardien from Pixabay

Now, Larry, on the other hand, wanted to be a Jazz Guitarist. Every chance he’d get he’d go into a music store and headed for the guitar rack.

Taking a guitar off the rack, he’d feel the weight of it in his arms. It was heavier than he had imagined.

Cupping his left hand around the neck with his thumb and fingers of his small hands almost touching on either side, he’d slide his hand up and down the neck to make that scratchy sound.

He ran his hand down the body of the guitar feeling its smooth, cool surface and contour.

Strumming a couple of times with his right hand changing positions with his left, he made the sweetest music he had ever heard.

The others in the store weren’t as impressed. But it was music, his first attempts at music. He just couldn’t wait any longer. He had to have a guitar.

His parents reinforced that it was only six more months until his tenth birthday.

Six months seemed like an eternity.

His daily trek home from school took a new path by the music store. Often, he’d just sit on the stool and gaze at the guitars. Other times the clerk would tell him he could take one off the rack if there weren’t many customers in the store.

The Golden Years

Image by Candid_Shots from Pixabay

Image by Candid_Shots from Pixabay

Larry and I were young, but many have just retired, needing something to do during their golden years. Perhaps, learning how to play a musical instrument will rekindle the longing from youth.

Is this you? Can you fit into one of these categories of wanting to play an instrument? Perhaps your dream is to play or play and sing in a band. Or perhaps you are of the classical persuasion and want to play in the orchestra you listen to at every opportunity.

No matter your age or circumstance, a new adventure is about to be, like moving to a new city with places to explore and new experiences to enjoy.

Your new adventure as a guitarist or pianist is about to begin.

My First Guitar (Larry S. Warfield’s Story)

Larry wanted to learn how to play a musical instrument, mainly a guitar, so bad he could hardly wait.

The six months passed slowly except for the encouragement given by the clerk who would show me how to play a few chords when the store wasn’t busy.

The day finally arrives, my tenth birthday. I was afraid I had begged too much for a guitar. Fear and anxiety welled up inside as I was called into the living room.

There on the coffee table was a guitar case. It wasn’t an expensive guitar, but I didn’t care. A cheap guitar from JC Penney’s felt like the most expensive guitar. It was mine, my very own guitar.

Asking for lessons was out of the question, but I didn’t care. I spent hours digging through music books doing everything mentioned. Even when my fingers hurt from the higher strings on the cheap guitar I didn’t quit. It just didn’t matter.

I checked out music books from the library until I had saved enough money to buy a book by Micky Baker on how to play jazz. For weeks I pored over the book day and night until I could play the chords and songs in the book.

Stopping was not an option.

As one of six kids, my parents could not afford to give me guitar lessons. My only option was to teach myself. It worked. I’ve now played for years. But, that’s the hard way.

Today there are many other options.

Getting Started With Guitar Lessons

Image by Vlad Vasnetsov from Pixabay

Image by Vlad Vasnetsov from Pixabay

Where do you want to go with music? Do you have a particular goal, perhaps to be a professional musician touring, playing gigs and concerts for fans? Would you prefer to work as a studio musician in Nashville, Los Angeles, or someplace else? It’s very difficult to realize your dreams if they aren’t firmly planted in your mind and heart.

Take the time to write out your goals. If you aren’t sure how to structure your goals and plans to reach your goals check the internet. You will find several websites with templates and instructions on how to fill them out.

Back to music…

Assess Your Progress

Do you have a face-to-face personal teacher or are you trying to teach yourself? If so, is your teacher the right person to help you achieve your goals? Again, you won’t know if your teacher is the right person for the job if you don’t know where you are going.

If you are trying to teach yourself, is it working, or is your progress very slow and draining your motivation? If so, you have several options.

Find a face-to-face teacher. If that isn’t an option for some reason check out the online video lessons. There are several websites that offer video lessons from total beginners to very advanced.

Don’t keep trudging along losing your motivation and desire.

Wait a second. If you’ve only been teaching yourself for a month or two and you haven’t gotten a music contract yet, you may be jumping the gun.

It takes time and a lot of hard work to be good enough to get a music contract or a job in a top studio.

Give yourself time. Be patient and work hard.

Still, your progress could probably be faster if you had a professional teacher. Check it out. Don’t be afraid to make a change.

Do something different.

If you have been trying to teach yourself for some time, you have developed habits that aren’t beneficial to where you want to go. How do I know?

You wouldn’t be losing motivation if what you are doing was working.

To change a habit you have to start by doing something different.

Give yourself permission to do something different. Some people think, “Oh, I start this I have to finish it.” No you don’t. Do something different.

Switch off the autopilot. Often we get into ruts that aren’t productive or don’t move us along toward our goals and we don’t even realize it. We’re just moving on autopilot.

Be more aware of what you are thinking and feeling. Assess the situation to answer the question, “Is this really working for me?” Be more in the moment.

Change things up by adding purpose into your playing. Perhaps you need to add more variety by playing different types of music. You may have thought you wanted to be a Country Guitarist, but if you give yourself a chance you might choose Jazz or Blues or even Classical.

Personally, after 12+ years of playing Classical Piano, I was bored and started playing more pop/rock ‘n roll music. It was refreshing and a lot more fun. I had learned the basics of Classical Piano which gave me a firm foundation for other types of music. I find it’s also very helpful in helping Larry publish the music he writes.

But most of all have the courage and self-confidence to do something different. Don’t get stuck in a rut.

Photo by Artem Podrez from Pexels

Photo by Artem Podrez from Pexels

 

Online Guitar Lessons

There are several companies and websites that have excellent online video lessons. Many of the companies offer the beginning lessons for FREE.

This gives you the opportunity to check out their teaching style to see if it is a good fit for the way you learn.

Some companies cater to beginners while others are lean more toward intermediate and advanced students.

Check out the companies:

  • What style of music do they teach?
  • What are their video lessons like? Do they show multiple views of the guitar?
  • Will you receive chord charts with the lessons?
  • Are the lessons downloadable?
  • What is the cost?
  • In the beginning lessons do they require a credit card upfront on the free lessons?
  • What are their ratings by other students?
  • Do they teach music theory and reading music from the beginning or does that come later?
  • Do they offer a practice routine or are you left on your own again?
  • Who are the instructors?
  • How many lessons do they have available?

Is It a Good Fit?

Many students are concerned about having to plunge into studying music theory in the first lessons. If so, find a company that focuses on guitar technique with theory coming in the advanced lessons.

In the beginning lessons, you need to be focusing on learning the first chords, different strumming techniques, how to change chords easily and smoothly. They also need to teach you how to apply the chords and strumming in playing a handful of songs.

One of the important techniques in teaching music is to have practice tapes to practice with. Some call them Jam Tracks.

The good Jam Tracks give you the experience of playing along with a professional guitarist and often with a full band. This helps increase your knowledge base and your confidence while being fun.

In the online video, lessons are guided by a professional instructor that will lead you through the lessons, especially the beginning lessons. This is where the beginning free lessons are important. You get to experience the lessons, the video presentation, and the instructor to see if they are a match for you.

Just Get Started Learning How To Play A Musical Instrument

Take the first step. You weren’t born walking and talking. You had to learn one step or one word at a time. Don’t just sit there on the floor sucking your thumb. You are NOT a baby. Get up and make it happen for yourself.

No one can do it for you.

P.S. You will LOVE Jammin’!!!

Join my email list to stay in touch and get your FREE MP3.

Smart Practice

All Music Things is excited to offer TrueFire’s Smart Practice. Jeff Scheetz, the Director of Education for TrueFire has designed a guitar practice routine, especially for guitarists, called Smart Practice. The system walks the student through practice step-by-step.

The answer is really very simple. It’s not just how long you practice. Or how hard you practice. Or even what you practice. It’s how you practice. Vince Lombardi said it best, ”Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect.” TrueFire’s Director of Education, Jeff Scheetz calls it Smart Practice and he’s designed a step-by-step guitar practice routine just for guitarists.

In The Jam

TrueFire’s In The Jam provides an exceptional jamming experience for the practicing musician. The Jam is different from any other on the market. It is the next best thing to practicing with a live band. And you will be practicing with some of the top artists. 

Each edition of In The Jam is uniquely organized with  10 multi-track video jams separated into video and audio tracks for each instrument.

You can adjust the video for your ultimate experience by muting, soloing, or adjusting the volume of all of the tracks. Plus, each jam includes a lead sheet chart showing the chord changes and the general structure of the jam.

A Live Band Experience

There’s no better way to develop your improvisational skills than getting up on the bandstand and jamming with a solid rhythm section and other players. In The Jam brings that bandstand into your practice room!

Jam Tracks are available with the purchased lessons or you can purchase the Jam Tracks in a bundle.

The best part, though, on TrueFire’s website you can play the Jam Tracks for free!!

Now, how good is that.

In The Jam: Frank Vignola & Julian Lag

This Jam track features Frank Vignola & Julian Lage,  showcasing their rhythm and lead guitar playing across 10 multi-track video…

In The Jam: NYC Funk

 In The Jam: NYC Funk features Chris Buono on guitar, Steve Jenkins on bass, and Keith Carlock on drums performing 10 funky multi-track video jams… 

In-the-Jam-Blues-Speaks

In The Jam: Blues Speak

“In this edition of Blues Speak I recorded live in the studio with my touring rhythm section featuring bass, drums, and B3 organ, Texas shuffles, some funky stuff…

In The Jam: TrueHeart Blues

“In this edition, we’ll jam together over some gospel progressions, classic rock, and roll, a funky sharp nine vamp, Chicago style shuffles, slow blues, minor blues…

In The Jam with Mimi Fox

In The Jam: Jazz with Mimi Fox

”For this edition, I put together a terrific rhythm section and we’ll be jamming together over minor and major blues, minor and major 2-5 changes, a couple of jazz standard progressions…

In The Jam: Rock, Blues & Country

”For this edition, I put together a killin’ rhythm section and produced 10 jam tracks live in the studio covering a wide range of feels, tempos, and keys… 

In The Jam: Kid Andersen

In this edition, I’ve put together 10 backing tracks that represent the range of feels that I play at my own shows. We’ll jam together over tough Chicago-style shuffles, a honky-tonk swing blues… 

30 Jam Band Licks

”This collection of 30 Jam Band licks is based around my favorite jam band progressions and I’ll show you how to string those chords together with melodies… 

In The Jam with Robben Ford

In The Jam with Robben Ford

Pull your time travel suit out of the closet to start your learning adventure back on Friday, October 27th of 2013, in one of Nashville’s premier recording studios…

Multi-Track Video Jams – You Control the Mix!

TrueFire’s In The Jam delivers an unparalleled jamming experience for the practicing musician. The next best thing to being there live, In The Jam puts YOU in the jam with top artists.

See More In The Jam

Each edition includes:

  • 10 multi-track video jams
  • Ability to mute, solo, and adjust volume
  • Lead sheet chart with chord changes
  • Artist commentary

When everything shut down with Covid, many lessons went to video. Video Music lessons have proven to be very beneficial. Read the articles below for more information.

All Music Things offers different types of video music lessons.

The guitar lessons are offered by TrueFire, founded in 1991. TrueFire has collaborated with 600+ top educators to produce what Guitar Player Magazine calls “the planet’s largest and most comprehensive selection of online guitar lessons. 2 million+ guitar players, from virtually every country in the world, learn, practice, and play.”

With TrueFire Guitar Lessons you get interactive video courses and patented learning systems for personalized and private online instruction. 

And TrueFire’s Beginning Guitar Lesson in each style is FREE. TrueFire’s success, over the years, is largely due to the high-quality artists and educators that have collaborated with them. 

The Guitarfella.com states, “TrueFire really excels with its tuition for intermediate and advanced players, with a huge range of courses, lessons, and styles available. You have the freedom to choose your own learning path, which can help keep you interested and focused, even if it involves a little less hand-holding.”

All Music Things - Music Lessons

All Music Things Presents TrueFire Guitar Lessons

Beginner, intermediate or advanced guitar players all advance to the next level quickly with TrueFire’s accelerated, hands-on study plan. There is no reading music or struggling through tedious music theory or boring exercises.

TrueFire’s Learning Path system assesses your current level of proficiency and creates a personalized curriculum of video lessons presented by TrueFire’s world-class guitar educators.

TrueFire’s intermediate and advanced guitar lessons have an outstanding rating in the guitar lesson arena.

Are you ready to get started? Don’t wait. Grab your guitar and get started.

Steps To Learning Guitar

Learning Paths for Guitars

Take your guitar playing to the next level with TrueFire’s accelerated study plans for beginner, intermediate, and advanced guitar players.

More to help you achieve your dream

In the Jam with Frank Vignola 600x300
In The Jam NYC Funk 600x300
In-the-Jam-Blues-Speaks

The best way to develop your improvisational skills is by jamming with a band, one with a solid rhythm section plus other players. TrueFire’s Jam Tracks brings that full band into your practice room. 

TrueFire’s In The Jam gives you the ability to practice with a band that you might not otherwise be able to do. In The Jam is the next best thing to practicing with a live band. And, you can practice with your favorite artists.

Don’t let this opportunity pass you by. Get Started Now!!

Alex Skolnick's Solo Factory Heavy Rock

Unbound Guitar by Alex Skolnick

When you hear the name, Alex Skolnick, you automatically think of Alex, the original melodic thrash guitarist playing with Testament. But, Alex is a man of many talents. He has released several critically acclaimed jazz albums with the Alex Skolnick Trio. He also plays with the Planetary Coalition. The Coalitions is a group of musicians from different walks in life and various regions around the globe. They work toward a cross-cultural musical vision.

Alex is pretty much a household name in heavy and thrash metal arenas, but refuses to be labeled in any specific musical genre.

Alex’s course, Unbound Guitar, Rock Guitar Lessons, is a great addition to TrueFire’s course selection. No matter your preferred style of music, Alex’s ear and eye-opening courses reveals underlying harmonic, creative, and technical foundations of his exceptional musical ability.

”Over the course of my career, I’ve played, recorded, and performed many different styles of music. What you might be surprised to know is that the building blocks of metal, jazz, acoustic, blues, world music (or really any style) relies on the same harmonic concepts, techniques, and expressive approaches at their foundational framework. I’m excited to share that framework with you here in Unbound Guitar,” Alex Skolnick.

Rock Guitar Lessons - Secret Sauce - by Jeff Scheetz

Jeff Sheetz, a world-renowned guitarist demonstrates his “secret sauce”, in Jeff’s Blues Rock: Secret Sauce Blues-Rock guitar Lessons. These are just a sample of the courses offered on TrueFire. These courses equip you with five essential concepts and techniques used in many blues-rock settings. You will learn how to slip “outside” and back again incorporating intervallic lines in your playing. Jeff also teaches the ins and outs of dynamic phrasing, melodic playing and modal playing, techniques used creating exceptional solos and comps.

Professional Review

I’ve been a fan of TrueFire for many years because they put out high quality education videos that expand on many of concepts I teach my students in different genres. The site can be a bit overwhelming because there are thousands of lessons, so I’ve picked out some of my favorites below. (If you find there are just too many good ones, you can sign up for an All Access Membership, which you can get for a month, year, or lifetime,)” Susan Palmer, Founder of Lead Cat Press.

All of TrueFire’s lessons are designed to have you up and playing quickly. The Bass Guitar Lessons will teach you how to play essential bass lines and rhythms. It also teaches you basic hand positions that lend to a good solid tone and how to strengthen your fingers for playing open and fretted notes. 

As with the other courses the First Steps For Beginners is Free. Stu Hamm who attended Berkley College of Music in Boston is the educator in the First Steps and also the Next Steps For Beginners

Stu met Steve Vai, who’s musical style is unclassifiable, at Berkley and subsequently met Joe Satriani. Hamm played bass on Flex-Able, Vai’s debut solo album in 1984. He has recorded with Vai, Frank Gambale a Jazz Guitarist from Australia, Joe Satriani, a rock musician and other well-known artists.

Bass Guitar is used in every style of music, especial Rock.

 

Bass Basics by Stu Hamm

Are you thinking of playing in a band as a bass player? Bass players are in high demand. It’s easy to find gigs and bands to play with making the bass attractive. But, you still have to learn how to play it well.

Stu’s beginning course lays down the basics for almost every style of music. He bridges the gap between percussion instruments and the melody played by the lead instruments and the vocalists.

Bass Guitar Lessons Online by Ariane Cap

Back Tracking Fifths

The Country Learning Path, taught by 2 top TrueFire instructors, Corey Congilio and Jason Loughlin, will have you up and playing as quickly as possible. The course begins with a classic country alternating bass rhythm and a single note country melody to help you get your twang on.

The next step will be to learn a bass line walkup which will link your country chords together. You’ll also learn three new strumming patterns and a bass line walkup which will help you spice up any tune.

You’ll then move into movable barre chords which will open up more country music songs as you learn to apply them to classic country songs.

 

What do you hope to accomplish as a guitarist?

Is your goal to be able to play and sing at the same time? Do you want to be a great guitar soloist like Tommy Emmanuel? Is your dream to play in a Country band and make it big in Nashville? No matter your goals, find a guitarist that can play at a higher level than where you are trying to get to.

This is where TrueFire shines. Their instructors are experienced guitarists in their own right. Many are GRAMMY winners or top studio guitarists. They are guitarists who can take you to where you want to go if you’ll put in the work.

Decide where you want to go as a guitarist. Focus on that goal instead of trying to do everything at once. Allow TrueFire’s instructors to help you reach your goal. After going through the beginning lessons you may decide you want to go a different direction, such as, playing bass or rock guitar.

Is it going to take work? 

Absolutely!! Weight out the cost in time and energy. If you are willing to put in the time and effort the TrueFire instructors will help you achieve your goal.

If you need some one-on-one help, TrueFire has private lessons to help you get over the hump and on your way to success.

Yes, the private lesson does cost more, but it is nothing like having to pay for private lessons one-on-one near where you live.

I did some research on how much private lessons cost on average from $225 per lesson to $40 per lesson. With private lessons, you do not have video lessons and jam tracks to play with. You have a music book and it’s up to you to remember how the teacher said to play it.

I took private lessons for years. Sometimes I would remember how the teacher said to play the lessons and other times I wouldn’t. If not, we’d be on the same material for weeks until I got it right.

TrueFire’s private lessons give you a video and documentation of the instructor’s comments and what he said to change. Trust me. It is far better to have video lessons than one-on-one private lessons.

More Sample Country Lessons

Country Guitar Instructors & Supplementary Information